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Open/36's S/36 environment is designed to look and act like a S/36. The familiar S/36 command line and menu functions present the familiar S/36 user interface.

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 Standard Features
 Optional Features

Open/36's S/36 environment is designed to look and act like a S/36. The familiar S/36 command line and menu functions present the familiar S/36 user interface. S/36 procedures, help text, and control commands perform as if the user was still on a S/36. No costly conversion process or testing is needed to run S/36 applications. Using Open/36's exclusive Load Member Processor, S/36 load members run efficiently at high speeds, giving the S/36 user increased productivity with little or no effort.

Standard Features

Open/36's S/36 Environment

The Open/36 environment shields the S/36 user from the unfamiliar UNIX environment yet, when needed, provides convenient access to UNIX functions. The familiar S/36 sign-on sequence is even preserved. No further training is need to start using Open/36. S/36 administrators will find a familiar S/36 console along with S/36 SYS-xxxx messages and S/36 Auto Response functions.

OCL and Control Command Interpreter

Open/36 includes a 100% compatible OCL interpreter which interprets System/36 OCL statements. S/36 applications are migrated and run with NO modification, or conversion. For more detailed information on S/36 commands running on Open/36, please refer to the Open/36 Commands and Procedures manual.

Workstation Support

Each terminal may have up to seven System/36 sessions running simultaneously. The operator may "hot key" between the sessions. Programs continue to run for all sessions, regardless of which screen is being displayed.

IBM 3151 model 31, 41, 51 and 61 ASCII terminals are supported, as is any VT220 compatible terminal. PCs can be attached via serial ports or via networks. IBM AIXstations and X-Window terminals are supported as well as most X-Window terminals.

Open/36 offers the ability to re-map the keyboard, customizing it for different terminal types or different users. The screen control can also be re-mapped to support different terminal types and single-byte national languages.

The System 36 Workstation Data Stream (WSDS) is supported. RPG and COBOL programs that manipulate their workstation output buffers by inserting screen attributes or by embedding WSDS commands all function on Open/36 the same as they do on a System/36.

Open POP

Included with Open/36 is Open Universal Software's Open POP. Based on the popular IBM POP products, Open POP give the "look and feel" of S/36 POP but with more functionality like "undo" and programmable command keys to make S/36 users more productive. Open POP contains:

  • A library browser (works like the System/36 LIBR)

  • A file browser (works like the System 36/FILE)

  • A full screen editor (works like the System/36 FSEDIT)


Open IDDU and ASCII file Support

Open/36 normally stores S/36 data in it's native form, EBCDIC. In some cases it may be advantageous to convert EBCDIC data to ASCII. Open/36 provides extensions to the IDDUXLAT procedure to do just that. IDDU definitions are used to maintain field and record definitions. Once S/36 data has been converted to ASCII, S/36 program continue to access data as if it was still in EBCDIC. EBCDIC-to-ASCII conversion is automatic. There is no recompile or conversion of S/36 programs. Once data is in ASCII, it can be read by native applications running on the RISC system. Likewise, using this feature, S/36 programs can now access native ASCII data as if it was a S/36 data file.

Open/36 Windows

Open/36 gives System/36 programs a modern windowed look and feel regardless of whether they are running on character or X-Window terminals. Programs can execute on one session at a time using the entire terminal screen as on the System/36 or, without modifications, can be run with a windowed look similar to Microsoft Windows, or Apple's Macintosh.

Open/36 Migration Utility

Open/36 provides a time saving function to speed migration of S/36 applications to Open/36. The Migration Utility can transfer your System/36 configurations including the user IDs. It can also transfer other software it finds on your System/36, such as IBM DFU and the RPG and COBOL compilers. While you can migrate using S/36 commands, the Migration Utility offers a POP like interface where you mark what items you want to migrate. Then, a single command copies the marked item to cartridge tape or sends items over communication lines to the RISC system running Open/36. Open/36 receives, or restores the items into the Open/36 environment.

DisplayWrite/36 Migration Support

Open/36 is the only S/36 migration solution which offers a migration path away from DisplayWrite/36. Using the migration utility, DisplayWrite documents are read from S/36 folders and converted into a RFT format. RFT documents are migrated to the RISC platform where they can be imported and converted to documents in applications such as Word Perfect. This offers a way to get S/36 word processing documents into PC word processing applications.

Load Member Processor

With the Load Member Processor (LMP) virtually any RPG II or COBOL program compiled on the System/36 can run on a UNIX, including those for which source code is not available and those which contain embedded assembler routines. With the LMP, you can quickly port by transferring your run time libraries and data files.

The LMP executes the following System/36 load members and functions: - Any standard RPG or COBOL program not using communications. - Any program using ASNA RPG III or 400/RPG extensions, including CALL/PARM to programs or procedures, library lists and named data areas. - Any program using BPS RPG II 1/2 extensions, including CALL/PARM. - NEP-MRT programs, including ACQ and REL Op codes, WORKSTN OCL statement, MODE control command, and Data Display workstations. - Programs using assembler routines with no supervisor requests, or using the following requests: $ALOC, $CLOS, $GETD, $PUTD, #WSID, $LOG, $INFO, $INV, $EOJ, $SIT, $RJT, $TOD, $WAIT, as well as most code that directly reads and writes library members in record mode, or reads and writes to data files or workstations through DTF's. - screen format definitions (S&D specs, $SFGR load members). - message members ($MGBLD load members).

Open/36 TURBO

Using Open/36's Turbo function, S/36 load members can be optimized for faster execution. Turbo'ing a S/36 load member causes S/36 functions to have more efficient UNIX functions executed instead. Open Universal Software recommends Turbo'ing all RPG and COBOL load members after migration.

Sample Open/36 Performance Data

Open/36 is written using a state-of-the-art Client/Server methods designed for RISC systems. This accounts for its superior performance, especially under high workload levels. Commercial application throughput is typically proportional to the efficiency of disk operations. The optimized B-tree structure used for Open/36 index files produces a much better performance than the System/36 ISAM design.

In single user mode, Open/36 on an RS/6000 has an average of a five fold speed improvement over the System/36. Open/36 becomes even faster relative to the System/36, as the RS/6000 disk cache comes active. As additional users are added, Open/36 performance improves even more over the System/36.

 

Optional Features

Open/36 contains all the facilities necessary to run many of your S/36 applications. Since most sites use only part of the S/36's functionality, we've incorporated only these usual functions in our base product. This keeps the cost of the base product low. For sites that use more of the S/36's functionality, we offer the following additional modules:

Open/36 Ready 2000

Open/36 is compatible with IBM SSP 5.1, which is not year 2000 compliant. You should consider the Open/36 Ready 2000 feature for your year 2000 support. This set of features refreshes the Open/36 operating system. This will be available Summer 1998.

Year 2000 compatibility
The Year 2000 Feature allows Open/36 to keep working in 2000 and beyond. All system components have been extensively tested to ensure your Open/36 operating system keeps working without any problems.

Four digit year support
Existing system features that return two digit years remain unchanged to not disrupt existing applications. Proper functionality is maintained by assuming dates with 2 digit years less than 50 are in 20xx while others are in 19xx.

The Year 2000 Feature allow you to take advantage of a new family of 4 digit year features:

OCL statements
DATE Allows either 2 or 4 digit years to be used.
FILE (disk) Allows either 2 or 4 digit years to be used.
FILE (tape) Allows either 2 or 4 digit years to be used.

Procedure Control Expressions
?CENT? Returns the two digit century of the current program date.
?CENTS? Returns the two digit century of the current system date.
?DATE2? Returns the current program date, with a four digit year, in the format of the current session date.
?F'A, '? Allows either 2 or 4 digit years to be used.
?F'S, '? Allows either 2 or 4 digit years to be used.
IF DATAF1 Allows either 2 or 4 digit years to be used.
IF DATAT Allows either 2 or 4 digit years to be used.

RPG assembler subroutines return (for Open RPG, IBM RPG II, ASNA RPG III, ASNA 400 RPG and BPS RPG II 1/2 compilers)
SUBR4Y System date as YYYYMMDD.
SUBR61 System date (and optionally the time) with a four digit year. Alternative to TIMER op-code.
SUBR62 Program date with a four digit year. Alternative to UDATE op-code.
SUBR63 Program date year as four digits. Alternative to UYEAR op-code.
SUBR64 Two digit century of the current program date.
SUBR65 Two digit century of the current system date.

COBOL Procedure Division (for Open COBOL)
ACCEPT identifier FROM [ DATE | DATE4 | DAY | DAY4 | TIME | TIME4 ]
Returns two or four digit years depending on the syntax used.

COBOL assembler subroutines callable with CBCALL (for Open COBOL and IBM COBOL)
OUS4Y System date as YYYYMMDD.
OUS61 System date (and optionally the time) with a four digit year in system date format.
OUS62 Program date with a four digit year in system date format.
OUS63 Program date year as four digits.
OUS64 Two digit century of the current program date.
OUS65 Two digit century of the current system date.

#GSORT supports date fields - with either two and four digit years
Fields in I, O, and F-specs can now be identified as date fields. They are specified by placing *DATE in the comment field, followed by the format of the date. Valid formats for dates with two digit years are: DDDYY, DDMMYY, MMDDYY, YYMMDD, and YY. Valid four digit year dates are: DDDYYYY, DDMMYYYY, MMDDYYYY, YYYYMMDD, and YYYY.

When date fields are compared to constants in I and O-specs, the constants should be in the same format as the date field. This makes for problem free comparisons.

Any character, unpacked, packed, binary or unsigned field can be identified as a date field. Dates with two digit years are sorted by default so that years 50 to 99 are in 19xx, while years 00 to 49 are in 20xx. A different boundary year can be specified in the H-spec.

Tape data management
Tape file expiry dates remain stored with 2 digit years for compatibility. Proper functionality is assured by assuming dates with years less than 50 are in 20xx while others are in 19xx.

Twinax Devices Attachment Support

On RS/6000 and HP9000 systems you can add Open/5250 Twinax Controllers. Adding one of these controllers allows you to connect your existing twinax terminals and printers, using your existing cabling systems. Your S/36 terminal and printer configurations can be migrated to Open/36, making your cut-over process quick and easy. The Open/5250 Controller preserves your existing S/36 devices. Most 5250 terminal and printers are supported. Our Open/36 documentation lists all currently supported devices.

5294/5394 Remote Workstation Controller Support (RWCS)

Open Universal Software offers the ability for an RS/6000 running Open/36 to attach remote twinax devices via IBM's 5294/5394 remote workstation controllers. By adding a multi-protocol communication adapter to the RS/6000, along with Open/36's RWCS, existing communication lines and equipment to remote sites are preserved. In addition to connectivity, remote devices also realize an increase in performance as remote programs execute faster.

ODBC - Connectivity - ODBC Server

Open Database Connect (ODBC) is a data request method created by Microsoft Corporation to standardize how programs request data from relational database servers. Open/36's Client/Server architecture is capable of providing ODBC server functions. Open/36 ODBC support allows PCs using ODBC compliant software (i.e., Lotus 1-2-3, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Powerbuilder, etc.) to read and update S/36 data. Out-of-the-box solutions can be created with the above PC programs to bring the world of Client/Server to your S/36 applications. While ODBC functions are occurring, S/36 program continue to run as usual.

Open Query

Open Query is Open/36's query product created to have the "look and feel" of S/36 Query. Open/36 QRYRUN procedure runs migrated S/36 queries without any conversion, recompiling, or source members. Open/36 users can continue to create new queries using Open Query and Open IDDU to define and link S/36 files and to create new query members. Open Query runs many times faster than Query on the S/36. New features optimize file joins for more functionality and allow more files to be joined. The Open/36 environment can be tuned to allocate great amounts of memory to further speed query execution.

IDA (Interactive Screen Application)

IDA is Open Universal Software's screen design tool. Designed as a replacement for SDA, IDA lets programmers be more productive as they create S & D specifications for their interactive programs. IDA creates the necessary source for screen formats and menus quickly and then compiles the code into the required load members.

APPC Communication Support

Open/36 Load Member Processor supports user written COBOL or RPG applications that use APPC commands. APPC applications run without recompiling. This support is offered in the form of a "toolbox" which is combined with services from Open Universal Software and SNA software for a complete communication solution. APPC Communication support is only available for RS/6000 and HP9000 computer systems. With APPC Communication support, these systems enjoy seamless interoperability with other hosts in a SNA network.

Multiple System Support

Open/36 Multiple System Support lets you consolidate a number of S/36s onto one RISC platform. Without any program modification, Multiple Systems Support keeps each set of S/36 data and programs separate. Using a path-type function, users can access data in other S/36 data sets. Combined with today's communication capabilities, Multiple System Support can offer significant savings over multiple S/36 sites.

Open RPG

Open RPG is a translating compiler which first translates RPGII statements into C, and then compiles the C statements into a true UNIX executable, optimized for the hardware platform running Open/36. In addition, Open RPG removes the 64k program size limit imposed by the S/36. Open RPG also allows up to 50 files to be opened in a program. Open RPG allows programs to take advantage of RPG400 Op codes and structured programming methods. Open RPG also supports RPG extensions offered by ASNA RPG and BPS RPG II 1/2. When compiling programs with Open RPG, additional program execution speed is achieved.

Open COBOL

Open COBOL is a compiler which works differently than Open RPG. The Open COBOL compiler compiles COBOL statements into an intermediate file. During execution, the Open/36 load member processor reads the intermediate file and executes the instructions.

Support for ASNA RPG and BPS RPGII 1/2

Open/36 provides support to migrate and execute load members compiled on the S/36 using either ASNA RPG400, or BPS RPGII 1/2. As with IBM compiled load members, these load members can be migrated from the S/36 and run without recompiling or source code.

Open IDDU and Relational Database Management System Support

Open/36 normally stores S/36 data in it's native form, EBCDIC. In some case it may be advantageous to convert EBCDIC data to Relational Database Management Systems (RDBS) such as Informix, Oracle, or Sybase. Open/36 provides extensions to the IDDUXLAT procedure to do just that. IDDU definitions are used to maintain field and record definitions. Once S/36 data has been converted to database tables, S/36 program continue to access data as if it was still in EBCDIC. EBCDIC-to-RDBMS conversion is automatic. The conversion process supports multiple record formats by converting them into multiple tables. There is no recompile or conversion of S/36 programs to use data in database tables.

Once data is in a database application, developers can continue using state-of-the-art development tools. Record locking and index maintenance is supported no matter if a S/36 program or a database program is updating a record. Likewise, using this feature, S/36 programs can now access Database table data as if it was a S/36 data file.